KINDERTRANSPORT IN THE NEWS (2014)

 

Ruth Moll speaks at the second World Kindertransport Day at the Burbank Town Center on Tuesday, December 2, 2014. Tim Berger / Staff Photographer

Ruth Moll speaks at the second World Kindertransport Day at the Burbank Town Center on Tuesday, December 2, 2014. Tim Berger / Staff Photographer


World Kindertransport Day in Burbank, CA

Kindertransport survivors share their stories. Burbank Town Center talk remembers 76th anniversary of Kindertransport.

Ruth Moll and Hilda Fogelson remember packing their life’s belongings into a single suitcase, the tearful goodbyes, not knowing when they would see family again — if ever — and the language barrier when they arrived in a new country.

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Paddington Bear inspired by Kindertransports

Paddington’s 88-year-old creator, Michael Bond reveals his inspiration for the kindly bear: the Jewish evacuee children he remembered seeing in the train stations of London during the Kindertransport of the late 1930s. “They all had a label round their neck with their name and address on and a little case or package containing all their treasured possessions..."

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Hard work pays off as Kindertransport Farm gets listed status

The Kindertransport Farm in Millisle, Northern Ireland has secured listed status, after leading a long campaign to ensure the historic site was properly protected.

Kindertransport Farm is closely linked to the Holocaust and Northern Ireland's own war history, especially the past it played in saving the lives of so many Jewish Children.

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The KTA Letter regarding unaccompanied child immigrants to the US

The Kindertransport Association, which represents many of the surviving “children” (now American citizens in their 80s) and their descendants, urges that the unaccompanied children arriving in the United States today receive the respect, protection and support that they require in order to rebuild their lives.

To read, download and send the complete letter: https://www.sendspace.com/file/1vxuac

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Stage Door: The Pianist of Willesden Lane

Mona Golabek's tribute to her mother's experience in the Kindertransport, a rescue mission that sent Jewish children to Britain prior to WWII, is mesmerizing. The Pianist of Willesden Lane, a story of bravery and survival now at 59E59 Theaters, should be required viewing.

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Sir Nicholas Winton,   Petr David Josek/Associated Press

Sir Nicholas Winton, Petr David Josek/Associated Press


Britain’s Schindler, a Reluctant Hero

In 1988, the BBC program “That’s Life!” aired an episode dedicated to Sir Nicholas Winton, a British stockbroker who rescued 669 mostly Jewish children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia in 1939. In the wake of Sir Nicholas’s 105th birthday last May, a segment from that episode went viral (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_nFuJAF5F0&feature=kp).

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BORDENTOWN: Middle school hosts Holocaust survivor

“What was the hardest part of your experience during the Kindertransport?” and “How do you feel about Germany today?” are just two of the questions Bordentown Regional Middle School students asked of Holocaust survivor Norbert Bikales during his visit to the school on May 30. Mr. Bikales told the audience of 180 eighth-graders, teaching staff, and administrators, how, as a 9-year-old in Berlin, he heard that his father and 17-year-old brother had been arrested.

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Lindenbaum Bicycle Odyssey - Returning After 76 Years

This is a story which started 76 years ago when the Nazis kicked my family out of our home in Unna. My brother Siegfried and I were refugee children who survived while my parents and sister did not. Today, I am retracing the story back to my home town with my wife, three children, their spouses, and my grandchildren.

I am excited to embark on this journey and would love to share it with you. Please follow my odyssey at odyssey76.com where we will be uploading daily updates.

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Escaping the Nazis, with a hero's help

In late April, the CBS program “60 Minutes” aired an extraordinary report titled “Saving the Children,” about Sir Nicholas Winton, an Englishman who in 1939 helped 669 children, mostly Jews, escape Nazi persecution in Czechoslovakia. Renata Laxova was one of those kids.

Laxova, 82, is an emeritus professor of genetics at UW-Madison. Last week, she sat at a shaded table in the backyard of her North Side home and recalled the year when she was 8 years old, and the whole world changed.

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Escaping Hitler Kindertransport: From Austria to England

Every spring, on Holocaust Remembrance Day, those who died under Nazi persecution are honored in ceremonies throughout the world; and those who survived it recall what they experienced. Anita Weisbord is among them.

When Hitler’s army annexed Austria to the German Reich in March of 1938, Weisbord’s homeland suddenly became unrecognizable.

“That was the end of my childhood as I knew it,” recalls Weisbord today, “Overnight, Jews became non-persons. We lost all our rights.”

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Nicholas Winton with one of the children he rescued. Courtesy Bee's Knees Productions

Nicholas Winton with one of the children he rescued. Courtesy Bee's Knees Productions


Nicholas Winton, the 'British Schindler', honoured by Czechs

A man nicknamed the British Oskar Schindler, who saved hundreds of Jewish children from the Nazis before the second world war and on Monday celebrated his 105th birthday, is to receive the highest honour in the Czech Republic.

Sir Nicholas Winton enabled 669 children – mostly Jewish – to escape from the German-occupied country,and come to Britain just before war broke out in September 1939. Many of the children's families were murdered in Nazi concentration camps.

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File photo taken 09 October 2007 shows British Sir Nicholas Winton in backstage of Prague's Congress Center Hall before a meeting which paid tribute to him.

File photo taken 09 October 2007 shows British Sir Nicholas Winton in backstage of Prague's Congress Center Hall before a meeting which paid tribute to him.


Man Who Saved 669 Kids From Nazis Turns 105, Gets Beautiful Birthday Honor

The story of Sir Nicholas Winton is one of the most profound tales of humanitarianism that you've probably never heard.

After saving 669 children, most of them Jewish, from likely death at Nazi concentration camps at the onset of World War II, it was announced Monday - on Winton's 105th birthday - that the heroic Englishman will be awarded the Order of the White Lion, the highest order in the Czech Republic. The award will be given to Winton this October.

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1939 letter found, Winton's plea to FDR to save Jewish kids

An archivist makes a stunning find after a 60 Minutes story airs about Sir Nick Winton, the Londoner who saved 669 children from the Nazis.

Last month, 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon told the remarkable story of Sir Nicholas Winton, a stockbroker in London who saved 669 Czech children from the Nazis during WWII. He said he had written a letter to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, describing the plight of the Czech children and asking that America grant refuge to a number of them.

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Holocaust survivors demand help for Syrian refugees

A Berlin-based artists' collective is pressuring the German government to take in more Syrian asylum seekers. It is supported by two Berlin Jews who survived the Holocaust thanks to asylum via the KIndertransport in the UK.

Grateful for their fate, they now want to help Syrian children escape the civil war raging in their country.

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The sole survivor

In the five-year run of Dandelions Flowers and Gifts' "Eugene's Favorite Mom" award, there had never been a nomination letter quite like it.

Written by brothers Sidney and Kenneth Brown, the essay described the remarkable life story of their mother, Charlotte Brown, who turned 90 on April 2.

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Walter Kohn

Walter Kohn


‘We Would Be Separated, Quite Likely Forever’

Nobel laureate and professor emeritus of physics at USCB, KTA member Walter Kohn recalls life under the Austrian Nazi regime, the death of his parents at Auschwitz and the good people who rescued him.

On Dec. 2, 1938, a train pulled into Harwich, England. On board were 196 children from a Jewish orphanage in Berlin that had been destroyed during Kristallnacht (Night of Broken Glass). Part of the first “Kindertransport,” the children were on their way to foster homes in Britain.

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Several events to focus on Kindertransport mission

The Kindertransport will be the focus of several events in May in Utica and Rome, NY.

At 2 p.m. on May 18, Karl Buchholz, a Kindertransport survivor, will speak at the Jewish Community Center in Utica.

The play by Diane Samuels, "Kindertransport," will be presented at 7:30 p.m. June 5-7 at Rome Community Theater, with a 2:30 p.m. matinee June 8. The Kindertransport Association Exhibition Panels will be on display at the theater.

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Yom HaShoah Service

n observance of Yom HaShoah, congregants at Beth Hillel Congregation Bnai Emunah, Wilmette gathered for a special memorial service on Sunday evening, April 27.
The program highlighted children of the Holocaust.

Each person attending lit a candle in memory of those that perished.

Two hidden children and one individual that was part of the Kindertransport shared their emotional and unforgettable stories of survival.

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Saving the children

Briton Nicholas Winton helped save hundreds of mostly Jewish children from Nazi-occupied Czechoslovakia on the eve of the war.

"Saving the Children"aired on April 27, 2014 on CBS news program 60 Mnutes. Bob Simon is the correspondent. Harry Radliffe and Vanessa Fica, producers.

Watch the video and read the transcript online: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/saving-the-children-during-world-war-11-60-minutes/

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The Things She Carried

The story of how KTA member Alice Eberstark and her two sisters made it onto one of Winton's trains is the subject of this week's 60 Minutes Overtime feature.

"Alice has one of the most heart-wrenching stories to tell," says Radliffe. "She remembers very clearly, before they left home, her father sitting on the edge of the bed, sobbing uncontrollably. They clearly had debated whether this was the right thing or not."

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German Radio story on the Kindertransport

Notizen aus England: Zug ins Ungewisse

Eine Reise ins Ungewisse: Eltern und Kinder wussten nicht, ob sie einander jemals wiedersehen würden. 75 Jahre nach dem ersten Kindertransport erzählen drei Deutsche von dieser Reise und ihrem Leben danach. Und der Dokumentarfilmer Sir David Attenborough erinnert sich an die beiden deutschen Mädchen, die in seiner Familie aufgenommen wurden.

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'I Had to See That I Didn't Come From a Black Hole'

"My sister Bertl doesn't call herself a Holocaust survivor," says Starobin, 76, taking her red glasses off. She won't put them on again until she has finished telling her story almost two hours later. "She says we weren't in a camp. But you know what? I lost my parents. I lost my home. I was resettled without having a say in it. That seems to me as pretty much being a survivor."

Esther Starobin is interviewed by Lilly Maier.

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Marga Forester with her great-grandson, Tapan Parker Wearn, in 2010.

Marga Forester with her great-grandson, Tapan Parker Wearn, in 2010.


Marga Forester, 90, Holocaust survivor

Marga Forester, 90, of Wynnewood, a Holocaust survivor who escaped from Nazi Germany to England on the famous Kindertransport, died Sunday, Feb. 9, of a heart attack at home.

Mrs. Forester, the former Marga Levy, was married to fellow Kindertransport survivor Frank Forester who died of respiratory failure Dec. 3, also at home in Wynnewood. He was 88. They were together 69 years.

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Museum gala to evoke memories of Kindertransport

The Florida Holocaust Museum could not have selected two more appropriate co-chairs for its upcoming “To Life: To Children” gala on Thursday, Feb. 27 in St. Petersburg when it honors those whose lives were saved by the Kindertransport.

Co-chairs Lisl Schick of Largo and Marietta Drucker of Seminole were both saved by what has become known as the Kindertransport – riding a train, then crossing the English Channel in a ship, as they escaped from Vienna, Austria, to London, England, in 1939.

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World Kindertransport Day on CNN

Christiane Amanpour's story on World Kindertransport Day, the seventy fifth anniversary of the Kindertransports, is viewable online, on youtube.

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Lotti Blumenthal holds a photo that includes her, 5th from left, back row, at Burges Hill, Sussex, England. Howard Lipin

Lotti Blumenthal holds a photo that includes her, 5th from left, back row, at Burges Hill, Sussex, England. Howard Lipin


Safe passage from horror of Holocaust

When Lotti Blumenthal was 13 years old in 1938, she packed some heavy sweaters, a Hebrew song book and two teddy bears named Eggi and Nüngi in a small suitcase, waved goodbye to her family and boarded a westbound train from Germany’s Hamburg station, never to return.

Blumenthal was a child of the Kindertransport.

“Not a day goes by that I don’t think about it,” said Blumenthal, now 88 and a widow. “It was a terrible experience, but I survived, and Hitler had one less child to kill.”

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Uli Herzberg at 12 . He was one of about 2000 German Jewish children sent to the Netherlands in the late 1930s to escape the Nazis. He was captured in 1943. COURTESY OF MIRIAM KEESING

Uli Herzberg at 12 . He was one of about 2000 German Jewish children sent to the Netherlands in the late 1930s to escape the Nazis. He was captured in 1943. COURTESY OF MIRIAM KEESING


Photo prompted Dutch woman to learn fate of Jewish children refugees

Dutch pianist Miriam Keesing never expected to research Jewish emigrant children who fled Germany for the Netherlands between 1938 and 1940. It began when she found a photo of a young boy in her family attic while looking for clues about her grandfather, whom she’d never met. Her aunt told her the boy was Uli, a German-Jewish refugee.

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Simon Shaw

Simon Shaw


New Exhibit by KT2 Inspired by Kindertransport

AN exhibition to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Kindertransport and Holocaust Memorial Day uses the artist’s own family’s involvement for inspiration.

Artist and teacher Simon Shaw, of Winterbourne Dauntsey, started working on his pieces about nine years ago using photographs from his father Otto’s childhood.

For more information, studio address and hours: http://www.studio53space.co.uk/

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Holocaust survivor and Dallas resident Magie Furst, by David Woo/Staff Photographer

Holocaust survivor and Dallas resident Magie Furst, by David Woo/Staff Photographer


Dallas exhibit recalls rescue of 10,000 Jewish children from Nazis

For almost 75 years, Magie Furst has owed her very survival to the kindness of strangers. She and her brother were among about 10,000 German Jewish children who survived the Holocaust because of a British rescue effort known as the “kindertransport.”

For many years, she’s helped the Dallas Holocaust Museum keep the events of that era alive by sharing her memories with students and other visitors. In an exhibit that begins Wednesday, her story and the kindertransports will be featured.

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