KINDERTRANSPORT IN THE NEWS (2019)

 

Frank Meisler’s The Arrival. Amy Williams

Frank Meisler’s The Arrival. Amy Williams


Britain remembers the Kindertransport but...

is in danger of forgetting its lessons

Reports in the UK press on September 1 revealed plans by the home secretary to end the current migration system which reunites refugee children with their families living in Britain in the event of a no-deal Brexit. If legal routes to family reunion close, thousands of children will be at risk. After surviving dangerous journeys, these children, who have already suffered greatly, will be extremely vulnerable to traffickers and exploitation.

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Shropshire's safe haven for Jewish children

One school which came to Shropshire early in the war provided a safe haven for Jewish children who had escaped Nazi persecution.

A blue plaque on Trench Hall at Tilley Green, near Wem, tells of its noble wartime role.

It says: "This progressive Jewish boarding school was founded by Anna Essinger M.A. in Ulm, Germany, in 1926, and was brought to Kent, England, in 1933 and evacuated here to Trench Hall over the war years, 1940-1946."

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BBC Witness History Kindertransport: a fantastic act of love

Dame Stephanie Shirley was among thousands of mostly Jewish unaccompanied children, who were sent by their parents to safety in the UK fleeing the rise of the Nazis in Europe. She was just five years old when her mother put her on a train in Vienna bound for London, not knowing if they would ever meet again. Dame Stephanie tells Witness History about the lasting trauma left by her mother's "fantastic act of love"

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How a battered trunk unlocked my family's Holocaust secrets

Raised in Kensington, west London, Urbach was the child of Jewish refugees who had fled to Britain from Germany in the Thirties. His mother, Eva, arrived as a teenager on the Kindertransport, the British rescue mission that saved almost 10,000 Jewish children from the hands of the Nazis. His family’s only physical connection with their past came in the form of three trunks, which Urbach remembers arriving at the family home when he was a young child.

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Eine ungewöhnliche Reise erinnert an die „Kindertransporte“

ARD Vienna|Southern Europe covers the Kindertransport Journey Trip. Radio and video as well as text. Journalist Andrea Beer interviewed travelers in Vienna.

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In Search of Prague

Remembering the Helping Hands of a Hero

Most people wouldn’t think about visiting a train station for any other reason than travel. But Prague’s Hlavní nádraží has an unexpected and important story to tell.

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Dr Christopher Stephens, Head of Southlands College, Vera Schaufeld and, Professor Jean-Noël Ezingeard, Vice Chancellor of the University of Roehampton

Dr Christopher Stephens, Head of Southlands College, Vera Schaufeld and, Professor Jean-Noël Ezingeard, Vice Chancellor of the University of Roehampton


Kindertransport refugee and teacher awarded honorary doctorate

A London university has awarded an honorary doctorate to a former Brent teacher who came to the UK on the Kindertransport and later established the Holocaust Centre and Museum.

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Nazi-era Kindertransport survivors return to Germany | DW News

Kurt Marx, a Kind living in the UK, visits Berlin in the summer of 2019. Video report.

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Refugee children from the Second World War return to Hoek van Holland

THe Kindertranspport Journey Trip met with students at the Kindertransport Memorial at Hook of Holland before boarding the ferry to Harwich, July 10, 2019

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Joodse kinderen van toen terug in Hoek van Holland

Before the Second World War broke out in the Netherlands, large parts of Europe were already ravaged by the Nazis. Jewish parents who feared for the lives of their children sent them to England by train.

A number of children from that time came to the children's monument in Hoek van Holland on Wednesday. Mark Burin (83) was three years old at the time and had no idea why his parents gave him up.

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Retracing Germany's tragic Kindertransport, 80 years later

Just months before the outbreak of the Second World War, 10,000 mostly Jewish children were granted refuge in England. Eighty years later, survivors are retracing a painful journey that is still relevant today.

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Reise in die Vergangenheit

Uberlebende der Kindertransporte aus den USA besuchten das Berliner Abgeordnetenhaus

Fünf Holocaust-Überlebende aus den USA waren in der vergangenen Woche zu Gast in Berlin. Am Freitag wurden sie gemeinsam mit ihren mitgereisten Angehörigen vom Präsidenten des Berliner Abgeordnetenhaus, Ralf Wieland (SPD), in den Räumen des Landesparlaments empfangen. Der Termin mit dem Parlamentspräsidenten war für die Zeitzeuginnen und Zeitzeugen Teil einer mehrtägigen Reise durch Europa.

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Als Kinder nahmen sie allein den Zug – ins Überleben

Four Holocaust survivors and 14 descendants of other Jews rescued by "Kindertransporte" traveled to Berlin on Friday, 80 years later. In cities through which the transports passed. Vienna, Berlin, Amsterdam, then over to England. In Berlin, the group was received in the House of Representatives and in the Bundestag.

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Holocaust-Überlebende sind als Gäste in Berlin

Holocaust-Überlebende und ihre Angehörigen besuchen Berlin. Sie fahren die Strecke der Kindertransporte nach, durch die sie gerettet wurden.

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Überlebende der „Kindertransporte“ und Nachkommen auf dem Dach des Bundestags Foto: Michael Jänecke/ Babelphoto

Überlebende der „Kindertransporte“ und Nachkommen auf dem Dach des Bundestags Foto: Michael Jänecke/ Babelphoto


Ein Zug rettete ihnen das Leben

erlin – Die war genau ein Jahr zuvor in einen Zug gestiegen. Gerade elf Jahre alt. Von Berlin aus über Amsterdam, dann mit dem Schiff nach England. In die Sicherheit. Ilse Henry sollte ihre Mutter nicht wiedersehen. Die Jüdin wurde 1943 in Auschwitz ermordet.

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Kindertransport survivors taken to retrace escape from Holocaust

The trip commemorates the 80th anniversary of the kindertransports between 1938 and 1939, which saved some 10,000 children from Central European countries.

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Kindertransporte. Züge ins Leben - Züge in den Tod

Four "childrens" of child transport rescued from the Nazis and 14 second-generation child transport survivors visit the children's transport memorial "Trains to Life - Trains to Death; trains to death - trains to life 1938-1939 "at Friedrichstrasse station in Berlin-Mitte.

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Jüdisch leben (Über 80jährige) Kinder

The children saved during the National Socialist era still know exactly how they felt then. We should also look more closely at today's refugee children, which they have already experienced traumatizing.

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Kindertransporte Überlebende kehren zu Besuch zurück

Sie wurden in der NS-Zeit von den Eltern weggegeben und so gerettet, jetzt kommen die "Kinder" mit ihren eigenen Kindern wieder.

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Corbyn calls for rejection of ‘language of hate’, citing Kindertransport

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has urged the country to “reject the language of hate and division” on World Refugee Day in a video referencing the Kindertransport.

The short 90 second clip shared on Thursday contains footage of refugee camps and migrant boats and calls for a return to “humanity, fairness and acceptance.”

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Yad Vashem Marks 80 Years Since the Kindertransport

Yad Vashem, the World Holocaust Remembrance Center, is commemorating 80 years since the Kindertransport with a new display of rare artifacts which belonged to children who escaped Nazi Germany on the eve of the Holocaust.

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Das bewegte Leben des Hans Menasse

Article on Austrian Kind and soccer player Hans Menasse.

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Hatred then, hatred now: Kindertransport memorial smashed

A new Kindertransport memorial in Prague which pays tribute to Sir Nicholas Winton’s 1939 rescue effort has been damaged by determined vandals who “came prepared”.

Police said they were investigating the attack on the Valediction memorial at Prague’s main railway station, where trains shuttled 669 Jewish children to safety in the UK.

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Prague memorial to Jewish children who fled Nazis vandalised

A memorial honouring the escape of mostly Jewish children from the Nazis, organised by Sir Nicholas Winton, has been damaged in an apparently carefully planned attack.

The Valediction Memorial at Prague’s main railway station – representing trains used to transport 669 children from the Czech capital to Britain – was left with a long crack across the length of a symbolic window pane.

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Seven Holocaust survivors named in Queen’s Birthday Honours List

5 KInder, including Walter Kammerling, 95, who arrived on the Kindertransport at 15, were honored for their dedication to sharing their stories.

“I don’t feel I am so very special. It’s a great honour. I do appreciate it. I thank everybody concerned that I do get this honour,” he said. “It is a personal talk, but this one does include all my family as well, and makes them more aware of what happened, and not just this but also of what can happen.”

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A Holocaust Art Exhibit Was Vandalized. But Vienna Is Fighting Back

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(Photo courtesy of ArtsPower)

(Photo courtesy of ArtsPower)


Tale Of Children Displaced By Nazis Comes To Westfield

'My Heart in a Suitcase' will be performed at Thomas Edison and Roosevelt Intermediate Schools Tuesday.

While every student in America learns about World War II, not many people remember the Kindertransport. Not many know that in 1938, as the Nazi rise to power began to spell a darker and darker fate for Jews, thousands of Jewish children from Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Austria left their homes on the Kindertransport and went to live in England in order to survive the war.

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Fit, bright, not too Jewish - Kindertransport policy

Children were admitted on the basis they were easy to 'Anglicise', researchers say. Children seeking sanctuary in Britain before the Holocaust were refused the lifeline of the Kindertransport if they were thought to have disabilities or looked too Jewish, say researchers.

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Dutch filmmakers making doc about Shoah hero appeal to UK Jews for help

Dutch filmmakers are appealing to British Jews to help them make a documentary about a social worker who became a Holocaust hero after helping 10,000 Jewish children reach safety via the Kindertransport.

Resistance fighter Geertruida Wijsmuller-Meijer, whose nickname was ‘Truus,’ was honoured as Righteous Among the Nations by Yad Vashem, after her wartime efforts – including smuggling children out under her skirt – came to light.

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‘Green Book’ Got Racism Wrong; This 1964 Film Got It Right

Can a white person realistically make a film about racism that avoids this trap? Well, yes. It’s not just possible; it’s been done.

The best example may be the 1964 film “Nothing But a Man.” Directed by Michael Roemer, a Berlin-born Jew who escaped Nazi Germany on a Kindertransport, and shot by Robert M. Young, also a white Jewish man, the film follows a black couple in Alabama.

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Nicholas Winton's Story on CBS 60 Minutes New Program

n honor of International Holocaust Remembrance Day, 60 Minutes looks back at Bob Simon's 2014 profile of Sir Nicholas Winton, who saved 669 children from the Nazis.

An extraordinary story from the Second World War, a humanitarian story that didn't come to light for decades. It concerns a young Londoner named Nicholas Winton who went to Prague, and ended up saving the lives of 669 children, mostly Jews, from almost certain death. His story begins in 1938, with Europe on the brink of war.

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Dr. Ruth Reflects on Escaping Nazi Germany 80 Years After Kindertransport

Before she became a world-renowned Sex Expert, Dr. Ruth Westheimer was 10-year-old Karola Ruth Siegel, one of thousands of Jewish children in Germany saying goodbye to their families for a life-saving journey.

"If I had not been sent from Frankfurt. If I had not been on that train on January 5, 1939 from Frankfurt to Switzerland I would not be alive," Westheimer said.

Sadly, the rest of her family was murdered. An exhibit at the Center for Jewish History showcases the rescue effort.

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Inge and Ellen: my family and the Kindertransport

An article in the London Financial Times written by the grandson in a family that took in two German Kinder. The Kinder are KTA members, and the families are still close.

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