KINDERTRANSPORT IN THE NEWS (2018)

 

Kindertransport: Rescuing Children on the Brink of War runs through May 24, 2019 at the Center for Jewish History in New York.

Kindertransport: Rescuing Children on the Brink of War runs through May 24, 2019 at the Center for Jewish History in New York.


http://gdusa.com/news/fresh/cg-partners-designs-emotional-kindertransport-e

Emotional Kindertransport Exhibition By C&G Partners

Related Website

Children re-enact the Kindertransport journey 80 years on. Credit: ITV News Anglia

Children re-enact the Kindertransport journey 80 years on. Credit: ITV News Anglia


Kindertransport: Pupils re-enact emotional journey to mark 80th anniversary

Schoolchildren across the region have been retracing the emotional journey of thousands of young refugees to mark the anniversary of the Kindertransport.

Eighty years ago, the first Jewish children to flee the Nazis started arriving by ferry at Harwich in Essex.

To mark the anniversary, students have re-enacted the journey at the stations of Harwich, Colchester, Ipswich and Manningtree.

Related Website


The Long Goodbye: Kindertransport Revisited 80 Years After

Relics of this haunted but rarely examined chapter of the Holocaust are now on display in a small but stinging exhibit, “Kindertransport – Rescuing Children on the Brink of War,” a collaboration of the Yeshiva University Museum and the Leo Baeck Institute, that opened this week in Manhattan at the Leo Baeck Institute at the Center for Jewish History, through May 24, 2019.

Related Website

Kindertransport–Rescuing Children on the Brink of War will be on view until May 24, 2019.

Kindertransport–Rescuing Children on the Brink of War will be on view until May 24, 2019.


Kindertransport–Rescuing Children on the Brink of War

Nov. 26 several hundred people braved the rain to attend the opening reception of Kindertransport–Rescuing Children on the Brink of War. YU Museum, with the Leo Baeck Institute, has collected dozens of artifacts, ranging from teddy bears and letters to suitcases, games and a dress tailored for a young girl’s violin recital, with videos and audio to commemorate the rescue program undertaken only months after Kristallnacht in 1938 that brought 10,000 children to safety in the United Kingdom.

Related Website


Clement Attlee took in Jewish child refugee who fled Nazis

Clement Attlee, the Labour prime minister whose government founded the welfare state, looked after a child refugee who escaped from the Nazis in the months leading up to the second world war, it can be revealed.

The then leader of the opposition sponsored a Jewish mother and her two children, giving them the confidence and authorisation to leave Germany in 1939 and move to the UK.

Related Website


The Cost Of Courage: The 2 Couples Who Rescued My Family From The Nazis

In recent months, I’ve learned that my life is bound together with two families who took enormous risks to save my father and my grandparents from the Nazis.

What I have discovered about the rescuers is both wondrous and bleak. One family, the Furstenbergs, has thrived; another, the Mynareks, is gone, seemingly without a trace.

My father, who had been rescued via the Kindertransport, was taken in by the Furstenberg family in Kalmar, Sweden.

Related Website


Kindertransport survivors call for government to take in child refugees

A group of 60 Kindertransport survivors have urged the government to provide more routes to sanctuary for child refugees.

'As former child refugees ourselves, we believe the UK government should give more children at risk the same life-saving opportunity that we had'

Related Website

Gert Berliner packed this toy monkey in a suitcase when he fled for his life nearly 80 years ago. It's now part of the collection at the Jewish Museum Berlin. Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Gert Berliner packed this toy monkey in a suitcase when he fled for his life nearly 80 years ago. It's now part of the collection at the Jewish Museum Berlin. Jacobia Dahm for NPR


A Toy Monkey That Escaped Nazi Germany And Reunited A Family

The monkey's fur is worn away. It's nearly a century old. A well-loved toy, it is barely 4 inches tall. It was packed away for long voyages, on an escape from Nazi Germany, to Sweden and America. And now, it's the key to a discovery that transformed my family.

The monkey belonged to my father, Gert Berliner, who as a boy in Berlin in the 1930s rode his bicycle around the city. Clipped to the handlebars was the toy monkey.

Related Website

Gert Berliner, 94, tied the little stuffed monkey to his bicycle when he was a child in Berlin. Claire Harbage/NPR

Gert Berliner, 94, tied the little stuffed monkey to his bicycle when he was a child in Berlin. Claire Harbage/NPR


A Toy Monkey That Escaped Nazi Germany And Reunited A Family

The monkey's fur is worn away. It's nearly a century old. A well-loved toy, it is barely 4 inches tall. It was packed away for long voyages, on an escape from Nazi Germany, to Sweden and America. And now, it's the key to a discovery that transformed my family.

"I liked him," recalls my dad, who is now 94. "He was like a good luck piece."

Related Website


Council backs Safe Passage campaign for child refugees on 80th anniversary

Organisers in Dorset of the campaign to allow three child refugees a year to settle in this county and all other local authorities have welcomed backing from county councillors.

Dorset county councillors voted unanimously to give their support to the local safe Passage campaign which aims to replicate the so-called ‘KinderTransport’ initiative 80 years ago this year when Britain took in 10,000 child refugees fleeing Nazi persecution in Europe.

Related Website

Elsa Shamash and her brother before they came to the UK on the Kindertransport picture © Jewish Museum London

Elsa Shamash and her brother before they came to the UK on the Kindertransport picture © Jewish Museum London


Remembering The Kindertransport 80 Years On at the Jewish Museum

“The first train arrived on December 2 so the organisations and volunteers involved reacted very quickly, it was a fast response and an amazing effort to galvanise the British Home Office,” says Kathryn Pieren, curator of Remembering The Kindertransport, a new exhibition at the Jewish Museum in Camden Town

Related Website

S Franklin Spira, with his mother, in an undated photo

S Franklin Spira, with his mother, in an undated photo


Reflections on the Occasion of the 80th Anniversary of the Kristallnacht

Today is the 80th anniversary of the Novemberpogrome, or Kristallnacht. I was a 14 year-old boy then and my parents and I never thought of emigrating until the Kristallnacht, even though Jews were gradually being deprived of their rights before then. At that point, it became clear that my parents and I could no longer remain in our homeland.

Related Website


The Kindertransport children 80 years on: 'My father had nightmares"

Even 80 years on from her flight from the Nazis, Elsa Shamash, 91, retains a strong German accent. She is a little deaf and her daughter helps her understand my questions. Her father was a pioneering radiologist and the family, which lived in Berlin, was wealthy. She and her brother Heinz were at private school before Adolf Hitler came to power, but then had to transfer to a Jewish school.
Video www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=3xxfOKoblHk

Related Website


The Kindertransport children 80 years on: ‘When I was 14"

Ruth Barnett, 83, was born in 1935, in a Germany that was already descending into Nazi tyranny. Her Jewish father was a judge who had been deprived of his post and frogmarched out of his court by the SS in 1933; her non-Jewish mother ran a cinema-advertising business in Berlin. “We had a brilliant future in front of us until the Nazis came to power,” she says.

Related Website


The Kindertransport children 80 years on: 'I'm grateful my parents sent me"

His place on the Kindertransport was obtained with the help of Jewish organisation B’nai B’rith, and, aged eight, he left Fürth in March 1939, to Hamburg and then by ship to Southampton – a picture of the ship, the SS Manhattan which brought 80 refugee children to the UK, adorns the wall of his living room. The only English he knew was one sentence his parents had taught him: “I’m hungry; may I have a piece of bread?”

Related Website

Ruth Zimbler, 90, was just 10 years old when Nazis invaded her hometown of Vienna, Austria.Tamara Beckwith/NY Post

Ruth Zimbler, 90, was just 10 years old when Nazis invaded her hometown of Vienna, Austria.Tamara Beckwith/NY Post


Holocaust survivor looks back on the night her life shattered

Then a 10-year-old in Vienna, Ruth Zimbler remembers standing outside her home with her brother and an older relative and watching the family’s synagogue burn to the ground.

“We couldn’t have known it at the time, but it was the beginning of the end,” Zimbler says.

Related Website


The Kindertransport children 80 years on: Adventure

n 1938, the first of the Jewish Kindertransport children evacuated from Nazi Germany arrived in Britain. This week, we’re publishing the stories of six of those refugees, beginning with Bob and Ann Kirk.

Related Website


These Kindertransport refugees didn't speak of their past for decades.

Ann and Bob Kirk both came to England as children on the eve of the Second World War. Even their children didn't know their stories.

Related Website


Miller South students presenting ‘Stories of the Kindertransport’

“The year 2018 marks the 80th anniversary of the Kindertransport and the 25th anniversary of this play,” said Miller South theater teacher Alex Funk in a press release. “Given the emotional journey of the production’s characters and its painful relevance to current events, ‘Kindertransport’ isn’t an easy show for middle-schoolers to undertake. But the story is an important reminder that we must learn from history to keep from repeating it.”

Related Website


Survivors Remember: The Echoes of Kristallnacht

Just before midnight on November 9, 1938, Gestapo chief Heinrich Müller sent a telegram to every police unit in Nazi Germany. “In shortest order,” it read, “actions against Jews and especially their synagogues will take place in all of Germany. These are not to be interfered with.” Firefighters stood by as synagogues and Jewish-owned homes, schools, and businesses burned to the ground. Within a day, 91 Jews had been murdered, and between 20,000 and 30,000 sent to concentration camps.

Related Website


Vienna's Kindertransport museum set to reopen in new home

The Kindertransport museum in Austria’s capital will reopen this October after a ten-month struggle to find a new home.

The new museum, which will reopen just in time for the anniversary of the first Kindertransport eighty years ago, will be housed in Urania, the Art Nouveau public education institute, in the heart of Vienna.

Related Website


Cyclists retrace 1938 Jewish ‘Kindertransport’ child refugee journey to Bri

BERLIN – Almost 80 years after the first “Kindertransport” evacuations of Jewish children to safety in Britain, 42 people set off Sunday on a memorial bike ride that will retrace their journey from Berlin to London.

Among the saved children was Paul Alexander. The only participant in the ride who was on a Kindertransport — “children’s transport” — he was joined by his 34-year-old son, Nadav, and 14-year-old grandson, Daniel.

Related Website

Grade I Listed Gwrych Castle in Abergele from the air

Grade I Listed Gwrych Castle in Abergele from the air


Kinder castle saved from ‘perilous’ state after 20-year campaign

The future of the Grade I Listed Gwrych Castle in Abergele, which was the original home of Zionist youth movement Bnei Akiva, was secured last week after UK government-funded National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) stepped in with “the final piece of the financial jigsaw”.

Dating from 1810, with direct links to British royalty, the castle housed 200 Jewish refugee children as part of Operation Kindertransport during the Second World War.

Related Website

Paul Alexander, and grandson Daniel, 14, are both taking part in a commemorative cycle ride from Berlin to London to mark 80 years since the Kindertransports. (World Jewish Relief/PA Wire)

Paul Alexander, and grandson Daniel, 14, are both taking part in a commemorative cycle ride from Berlin to London to mark 80 years since the Kindertransports. (World Jewish Relief/PA Wire)


81 Year-Old Kindertransportee Will Retrace His Holocaust Escape Route

Paul Alexander, a former child refugee from Nazi Germany, is embarking on a bike trip that will retrace his original journey to freedom, paying tribute to the Kindertransport effort that saved him and thousands of other Jewish children 80 years ago.

Now 81, Alexander was a toddler when his mother handed him to a volunteer nurse on a train leaving Nazi Germany in 1938.

Related Website


On a bike, ex-child refugee retraces escape from Nazi Germany

Paul Alexander, 81, will pedal 600 miles with son, grandson and 39 others to pay tribute to Kindertransport program that saved thousands of Jewish children.

Related Website


My Separation Trauma

KTA member Eva Yachnes has written a letter to the New York Times:

When I was 6, I was torn, screaming, from my grandmother and put on a train taking me far from home and family. Unlike the tragedy perpetrated by our president, my separation was done to save me from the Nazis. I was put on a Kindertransport from Vienna bound for England....

Related Website


On a Bike, Ex-child Refugee Retraces Escape From Nazi Germany

Now 81, the former refugee child on Sunday began retracing that journey to freedom — but this time by bicycle as part of a commemorative ride to pay tribute to the Kindertransport scheme that saved him and thousands of Jewish children eight decades ago.

Related Website

Kindertransport Commemmoration cyclists start out. Yeshiva World.

Kindertransport Commemmoration cyclists start out. Yeshiva World.


Cyclists Retrace Jewish Child Refugees’ Journey To Britain

Almost 80 years after the first “Kindertransport” evacuations of Jewish children to safety in Britain, 42 people set off Sunday on a memorial bike ride that will retrace their journey.

The cyclists set off from Berlin’s Friedrichstrasse station, where a statue commemorates the 10,000 mostly Jewish children who made it to Britain from Nazi Germany and elsewhere in Europe starting in late 1938.Organized by the British-based World Jewish Relief group, the ride retraces the route of the trains.

Related Website


Dr. Ruth, Dr. Kissinger, and Trump’s Cruelty to Families

Related Website


Kindertransport child refugee who fled Nazis to retrace journey

An 80-year-old refugee who arrived in Britain from Nazi Europe as a toddler is taking part in a cycle ride to mark the rescue of 10,000 children.

Paul Alexander will retrace the first journey of the Kindertransport rescue for the 80th anniversary.

The rescue was organised after the anti-Jewish violence of Kristallnacht in Germany in November 1938.

Related Website


Cyclists to retrace route of Kindertransport that saved 10,000 from Holocau

World Jewish Relief has organised the commemorative ride from Berlin to London to mark 80 years since the evacuation effort.

Related Website


Remembering: The night of the broken glass

There were tears that come with such a parting, a 12-year-old boy leaving his parents to live with strangers far away, but they dried in a current of excitement as the train rumbled out of Berlin's Zoo Station. In his small suitcase were clothes with name tags sewn in by friends of his mother the night before.

John Berrys leaned through the open window as the train slowly rolled west. He said goodbye.

Related Website


Do you know these children? The mystery of the Kindertransport photos

The quest of a daughter of a Kindertransport survivor to discover the identity of others who accompanied her.

The photographs are old — 77 years old — but the children in them are young. Some look serious, while others smile. At that point in time, it was still not yet clear that they had escaped from the ultimate horror. As children of the Kindertransport, some of them would never have seen their family again.

On the back of some of the pictures are messages—a few barely leg­ible.

Related Website


When German trains saved Jewish kids

While Germany’s Reichsbahn is most infamous for carrying Jews to their final destination, the national rail system was also used to transport 10,000 Jewish children to safe haven in the UK.

“My mother had a choice. She could save me, or one of my brothers. Only one of us could go to England, and she thought it would be easier for a girl to be placed in a family. I was lucky.” That’s how the three-year-old Ruth Auerbach ended up at Berlin’s Friedrichstraße station on February 2, 1939.

Related Website


Holocaust survivor returns to Millisle

She survived the horrors of Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen, where most of her family were murdered by the Nazis.

But it was on the County Down coast that Rachel Levy began to recover from the Holocaust.

She was among a small number of Jewish orphans brought to live in a farm near Millisle in the immediate aftermath of World War Two.

Related Website


Kindertransport Commemorative Cycle. Berlin to London 17-22 June 2018

World Jewish Relief is creating an exceptional new cycle challenge to commemorate 80 years since they, as the Central British Fund for German Jewry (CBF), orchestrated the Kindertransport and brought 10,000 children to safety.

This unique six day cycle will emulate the journey taken by the children on the first Kindertransport train, departing Berlin and travelling to London Liverpool St, via Holland and the ferry to Harwich.

Related Website


Boy who fled Nazi Germany in Kindertransport tells tale of survival

Ken Appel, 90, spoke to Watford Rotary Club about being beaten by his former friends and eventually being expelled from school for being Jewish during the rise of the Nazi Party.

Related Website

 

 
Home  |  History  |  Exhibits  |  Voices of the Kindertransport  |  Events  |  Resources  |  About Us  | Join, Renew, Donate  |  Contact Us  |  Find us on Facebook


The Kindertransport Association